Psalm 46:10 for Now

Online Liturgies May - August 2021

 

by Pastor Marshall

 

In lieu of our time together due to the stay-at-home orders issued by our government, because of the coronavirus troubles – which have put our worshiping, studying and serving in our building in abeyance – I offer these abbreviated online liturgies. They in no way are equivalents to our normal fare, when we gather in our beautiful church to sing praise to Almighty God around Word and Sacrament. But they still have value. In them I’m taking advantage of our time apart to accentuate Psalm 46:10 about being silent before God. These liturgies have no audio tracks (except for a hymn link here and there) or video streams – which in Mendocino County, California, have been banned (Doug Mainwaring, “California County Bans Singing in Online Worship Services,” LifeSites, online, April 17, 2020). So what we have here are just words. If I were to provide instead a full mock worship service online, that would be inconsistent with our mission statement and the honor it pays to historical liturgies (which require a congregation present). So the liturgies I provide are short, meditative in tone, and solitary. Use them to stand silently before God and his Word – and its elaborations in prayers, hymn texts, art works, and sermons. Luther thought God has his way with us in this silence (Luther’s Works 6:35). Kierkegaard agreed, seeing in this silence God’s Word gaining power over us (For Self-Examination, ed. Hongs, p. 47). He even thought, somewhat humorously, that by blunting our “loquacity” through this silence, God’s ways were protected from any “undietetic uncircumspection” coming from us (The Book on Adler, ed. Hongs, p. 166). Be that as it may, we must never forget, as Kierkegaard elsewhere warned, that Christianity is not primarily for quiet times, but for fighting the good fight of faith “right in the middle of actual life and weekdays” (Journals, ed. Hongs, §2:2132).


 

 




Online Sunday Liturgy

May 9, 2021


 


Bulletin Cover

 

 

The true church may not and cannot have an earthly head. It may be ruled by no one on earth, neither bishop nor pope. Here only Christ in heaven is the head and he rules alone…. [For] how can a man rule something he neither knows nor recognizes?... No one is able to instill… into another man or into his own soul the faith, mind, and will, and activity of Christ except Christ alone.

 

Martin Luther, On the Papacy in Rome (1520),

Luther’s Works 39:7172.

 



 
 


Online Abbreviated Sunday Liturgy

Pastor Marshall

May 9, 2021

 

Sixth Sunday of Easter

 

In the Name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

Let us pray:

Heavenly Father, guide us by the power of your Spirit to think those things that are right, and by your goodness, help us to do them. In the name of Jesus we pray. Amen.


First Lesson: Acts 11:19–30

Psalm 98

Second Lesson: 1 John 4:1–11

Gospel: John 15:9–17

 

Opening Hymn: “Life High the Cross” (LBW 377)

 



 
 




Sermon: May 9, 2021

 

Take Christ's Name

(Acts 11:26)

Grace and peace to you in the Name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

     Followers of Jesus – they’re called Christians (Acts 11:26). Do you like that? Originally you were called people belonging to the Way (Acts 9:2). Do you like that name better? Or how about Nazarenes (Acts 24:5) – since Jesus was from Nazareth (John 1:46). Would you prefer being called Nazarenes? Members of the Church of the Nazarene (est. 1907) to this day are called Nazarenes (Floyd Cunningham, Our Watchword and Song: The Centennial History of the Church of the Nazarene, 2009). Does that sound better to you? If so, then why is it that the name “Christian is the one that has stuck,… becoming in every language the preeminent mark of identification for the disciples and the church in every age” (Jaroslav Pelikan, Acts, 2005, p. 141)? No explanation is given except the indirect verse that God made Jesus the head of his Church (Ephesians 1:22). It looks like that’s why Christian is the name that won out over all the others. Christians belong to the Church that Christ runs – that’s why Christians are named after the one who leads them.

     But don’t we build churches, pay the bills, hire people who work in the churches, and decide what is to be done in them? It doesn’t look like Jesus is the head of the Church. He’s the inspiration, but he doesn’t run it. We do. Nothing else makes any sense. But that’s right where the Bible upsets everything. It’s God’s word and it runs the Church. So even though we don’t see Jesus at church council meetings or out pruning the gardens, his word still calls the shots. In fact, as Martin Luther argued, “the Word, the Word, the Word,… everything depends on the Word” (Luther’s Works 40:212, 214). It’s what “encourages the timid [and] terrifies the presumputous” (LW 14:338). Because everything that we do in the Church is to align with Christ’s word, he then runs it and not us. The Church “will not be known by sight, but by faith” in God’s word (LW 35:410). So his word holds our feet to the fire of his wisdom and his way of living. And if we don’t give Christ and his word our “allegiance and obedience,” then we’ll be “smashed like pottery” (LW 78:355). That’s what the leader of the Church can do to us. So don’t be fooled by the grace of God revealed in Jesus Christ. It doesn’t make him all sweetness and light. For those “hardened heads” who resist him, he is a “frightening Christ” (LW 77:85). The stakes are therefore very high. If we try to run the Church instead of regulating it by God’s word, then “its head is dead” (LW 39:72). “The true church,” Luther argues, “may not and cannot have an earthly head. It may be ruled by no one on earth…. Here only Christ in heaven is the head and he rules alone…. [For] how can a man rule something he neither knows nor recognizes?... No one is able to instill… into another man or into his own soul the faith, mind, and will, and activity of Christ except Christ alone” (LW 39:71–72). The true Church “does not depend on [any] person” in the congregation, but only on Christ and his word (LW 41:348).

     Even though “the whole world has nothing better, more precious, or nobler than the church, in which the voice of God is heard,” yet because “the church is so hidden from view by the cross, by afflictions, by dishonor, and by contempt,… the world concludes that nothing is more detestable and baneful” than the church (LW 4:6). The ungodly “claim to be so smart as to find the truth in themselves and to discover the way to salvation, satisfaction for sin, and atonement with God through themselves. They will not hear or tolerate any other doctrine.... Because of the great beams [in their eyes], it is impossible for the Holy Spirit to find room in them or to enter their hearts or their sight, even though He stands there openly and raps everywhere for admission. They are so engrossed in and blinded by their own notions that they cannot hear, see, or understand anything of what is proclaimed about Christ” (LW 24:122–23). That’s why a disruption has to occur – with salvation coming under no other name than that of Christ (Acts 4:12). He is the Lamb of God who was slaughtered for our salvation (Acts 8:32–35). What a formidable declaration! God punished him and spared us – “by his poverty [we have] become rich” (2 Corinthians 8:9). “Before we had Christ, we were [therefore] at peace with the devil but at war with God” (LW 24:181). Christ has ended that war. By making that happen, he becomes our “capital wealth, base, ground, and the whole sum, around and under which everything is gathered and found, and in him are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and understanding.” In fact, “all error, heresy, idolatry, offense, misuse, and evil in the church originally came from despising or losing sight of this article of faith in Jesus Christ” (LW 34:307). So hold on to Christ. You cant think your way to God. Reason fails us, and we cry out “With a specious and cunning appearance of thought, I seem to be catching but never have caught” (Poems of Henry Timrod with Memoir and Portrait, 1899, p. 31). Reason cannot be our “titanic material” (Pablo Neruda, Canto General, trans. J. Schmitt, 1950, 1991, p. 76). We need Christ. For his “cross was the altar on which He, consumed by the fire of the boundless love which burned in His heart, presented the living and holy sacrifice of His body and blood to the Father with fervent intercession, loud cries, and hot, anxious tears” (LW 13:319). That’s precisely what save us!

     This fantastic news we cannot keep to ourselves. Like Jeremiah of old, it burns in our hearts and we grow weary with holding it in (Jeremiah 20:9). The word has to get out. And so all believers in Christ are called to be his “ambassadors” (2 Corinthians 5:20). As such we are to give account to anyone who asks us about the hope that is within us (1 Peter 3:15). But that doesn’t mean selling Christ to the lowest bidder. We mustn’t peddle cheap grace for Christ – thereby serving up “the grace of God in vain” (2 Corinthian 2:17, 6:2). We mustn’t “throw pearls before swine” (Matthew 7:6). Accordingly “you may deal harshly with the.. hardened…. and act boldly in opposition to their teachings,… for they will not listen. But the simple people… whose lives are endangered, you must… with caution and gentleness undo the teachings of men, providing them a defense,… and in this way gradually set them free…. You must treat dogs and swine differently from men; wolves and lion differently from the weak sheep. With wolves you cannot be too severe; with weak sheep you cannot be too gentle” (LW 45:73). So be ready for opposition. Christ and his church have been hated from the beginning (John 15:18). For centuries the attack has been direct and virulent, saying that “the preachers who tell us to live in fear and trembling are lying. God has no interest in our actions, and though nature is beautiful and intricate, there is no evidence of an underlying intelligent design. What should matter to us is the pursuit of pleasure, for pleasure is the highest goal of existence” (Stephen Greenblatt, The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, 2011, p. 220). So dig in. You’ve been warned. Take your ambassadorship seriously, you who would be followers of Christ, for by so doing you will also take to heart his name. Amen.

 

Hymn of the Day: “Spread, Oh, Spread, Almighty Word” (LBW 379)



 



Litany on the

Coronavirus Disease 2020 (COVID-19)

 

 

Let us pray for all those worldwide who have died from COVID-19. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us give thanks for the government agencies and other medical research teams who are diligently working to curb the spread of this virus. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for the many who are sick and suffering from this disease. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

And let us also pray for all those grieving the loss of loved ones who have died from COVID-19. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for the many who are caring for the infected and the sick, that full health and strength and peace may be granted. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for our world where we’re but sojourners (Psalm 119:19; Philippians 3:20), that we may not be punished by disease and pestilence (Ezekiel 14:21, Luke 13:5, John 5:14), and that health and peace may abound for all – for it is Christ who takes upon himself “our infirmities and diseases” (Matthew 8:17). Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Finally, in our fear of disease and sickness – may we ever remember God’s power to heal (Jeremiah 17:14, James 5:14), those many kept safe from COVID-19 and other infectious diseases, and our Savior Jesus who, by his mercy and in his time, rekindles our faith by restoring health in this vulnerable and perilous life (2 Kings 5:14, Acts 3:6).

 

GLORY BE TO CHRIST OUR LORD & GREAT HEALER! AMEN.




 



LUTHER on epidemics

 

“Some people are of the firm opinion that one… should not run away from a deadly plague. Rather, since death is God’s punishment, which he sends upon us for our sins, we must submit to God…. I cannot censure [this] excellent decision…. It takes more than a milk faith [1 Corinthians 3:2] to await a death before which most of the saints… are in dread…. [But since] it is generally true of Christians that few are strong and many are weak, one simply cannot place the same burden upon everyone…. Peter could walk upon the water because he was strong in faith. When he began to doubt,… he sank and almost drowned [Matthew 14:30]…. Let him who has a strong faith wait for his death, but he should not condemn those who take flight…. [Even so, know that] all illnesses are punishments from God…. [These punishments] come upon us, not only to chastise us for our sins but also to test our faith and love…. [So] my dear friends,… use medicines… which can help you; fumigate house, yard, and street; shun persons and places wherever your neighbor… has recovered, and act like a man who wants to help put out the burning city. What else is the epidemic but a fire?... You ought to think this way: ‘Very well, by God’s decree the enemy has sent us poison…. Therefore I shall ask God mercifully to protect us. Then I shall… administer medicine and take it. I shall avoid places and persons where my presence is not needed in order not to become contaminated and thus perchance infect and pollute others, and so cause their death as a result of my negligence. If God should wish to take me, he will surely find me and I have done what he has expected of me and so I am not responsible for either my own death or the death of others. If my neighbor needs me, however, I shall not avoid place or person but will go freely…. This is such a God-fearing faith because it is neither brash nor foolhardy and does not tempt God.’”

 

[Martin Luther, Whether One May Flee from a Deadly

Plague (1527), Luther’s Works 43:120, 124, 127, 131–32.]




 


Intercessions:

 

We remember in prayer church members.

Leah &Melissa Baker

Marlis Ormiston

Eileen & Dave Nestoss

Connor Bisticas

Kyra Stromberg

Sam & Nancy Lawson

The Tuomi Family

Holly Petersen

Doris Prescott

Rollie

 

                                                                       

We also pray for friends of the parish

who stand in need of God’s care.

Karen Granger

Tabitha Anderson

The Rev. Randy Olson

The Rev. Howard Fosser

The Rev. Kari Reiten

The Rev. Alan Gardner

The Rev. Allen Bidne

The Rev. Albin Fogelquist

Kari Meier

Yuriko Nishimura

Leslie Hicks

Eric Baxter

Evelyn, Emily & Gordon Wilhelm

Garrett Metzler

Lesa Christensen

Noel Curtis

Antonio Ortez

Garrison Radcliffe

Richard Patishnock

Jeff Hancock

Holly & Terence Finan

Ty Wick

Lori Aarstad

Anthony Brisbane

Dona Brost  

Susan Curry

Karin Weyer

Robert Shull family

Alan Morgan family

Geri Zerr & Mark

Lucy Shearer

Ramona King

Karen Berg

Donna & Grover Mullen

Patty Johnson

Kurt Weigel

Ethan, Erin and Kevin Vodka

Carol Estes

Paul Jensen

Wendy Pegelow

Tak On Wong & Chee Li Ma

Steve Arkle

Hank Schmitt

Ron Combs

Mary Ford

Andrea and Hayden Cantu

The Pritchard family

Liam Stein

 

Pray for unbelievers, the addicted, the sexually abused and harassed, the homeless, the hungry and the unemployed. Pray for the many dying from COVID-19in India.  Pray also for refugees throughout the world; and for the care and keeping of our planet.

 

 

                                                                       

 

Professional Health Care Providers

Gina Allen

Janine Douglass

David Juhl

Dana Kahn

Dean Riskedahl



 



Holy Communion in Spirit and Truth

Without the Consecrated Bread and Wine

 

[The ancient church doctrine of concomitantia teaches that the faithful can receive Christ’s Presence in Holy Communion by drinking the wine without eating any bread, or by eating the bread without drinking any wine (The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, ed. F. L. Cross, 1958, 1966, pp. 320–21). By extension, in extreme cases, the faithful can also, then, receive Christ’s Presence without eating the bread or drinking the wine. Those would be cases of illness when nothing can be ingested through the mouth, or when lost in the wilderness – living off nothing but wild animals and berries. In those cases we keep the memory of Jesus in the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 11:24) – honoring our Savior “in spirit and truth” (John 4:23). So pray the words below, all you baptized, who love the Lord Jesus, and “hunger and thirst for righteous,” that you may be satisfied (Matthew 5:6). This is not a substitute for Holy Communion, but rather a devout practice when receiving Holy Communion in times of pestilence and plague would recklessly endanger the church (Luther’s Works 43:132–33).]

 

Let us pray: O Lord, our God, we remember this day our savior Jesus, who “was put to death for our trespasses and raised for our justification” (Romans 4:24). May his Spirit “bring to remembrance” all that he did for us, and continues to do, to bless us (John 14:26). Fill us with the assurance that our sins are truly forgiven for his sake, and that the promise of eternal life will not be taken away. Amen.

 

Let us pray: On this day, heavenly Father, we also pray in the name of Jesus, that one day soon we will be able to gather together at the Altar of our church, and so eat of the flesh of our Lord and drink of his blood, that his very life may well up in us so that we may abide in him forever (John 6:53–56). Amen.



 



 

The Lord’s Prayer

 

Benediction: The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you; the Lord look upon you with favor and give you peace. In the name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.  


Closing Hymn: “Christ is King” (LBW 386)



 



 

 

No matter how much they see, hear, boast, and preach of Christ and the Holy Spirit, they still do not know Him. For their path to this goal is obstructed by the huge blocks and boulders of their personal notions, which they follow. They claim to be so smart as to find the truth in themselves and to discover the way to salvation, satisfaction for sin, and atonement with God through themselves. They will not hear or tolerate any other doctrine…. Because of the great beams, therefore, it is impossible for the Holy Spirit to find room in them or to enter their hearts or their sight, even though He stands there openly and raps everywhere for admission. They are so engrossed in and blinded by their own notions that they cannot hear, see, or understand anything of what is proclaimed about Christ.

 

Martin Luther, Sermons on John 14 (1538)

Luther’s Works 24:122–23.



 


 

 




Online Sunday Liturgy

May 2, 2021

 


Bulletin Cover

 

They are doomed to eternal doubt; and the more they work and torment themselves in an effort to please God, the greater their uncertainty becomes, until finally it culminates in despair. This is the inevitable lot of all who rely on themselves and their deeds. For in the final analysis we will find that so far as we are concerned all our works, even the best, are sinful and damned to hell in the sight of God. God’s Word has already pronounced wrath on man’s own ability, power, and works. Whatever does not abide in this Vine Christ must be condemned and exterminated. Therefore he who wants to be helped out of such doubt should be intent solely on coming out of himself and all his works into Christ and on learning to know how we come to grace through Him, are pleasing to God, and thus through faith are grafted into Him as branches.

 

Martin Luther, Sermons on John 15 (1538)

Luther’s Works 24:219–20.



 
 


Online Abbreviated Sunday Liturgy

Pastor Marshall

May 2, 2021

 

Fifth Sunday of Easter

 

In the Name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

 

Let us pray:

O Lord, our God, make us love what you command and desire what you promise, that, amid all the changes in this world, our hearts may be fixed where true joy is found. In the name of Jesus we pray. Amen.


First Lesson: Acts 8:26–40

Psalm 22:24–30

Second Lesson: 1 John 3:18–24

Gospel: John 15:1–8

 

Opening Hymn: “We Know That Christ Is Raised” (LBW 189)

 



 
 




Sermon: May 2, 2021

 

Depend on Christ

(John 15:5)

Grace and peace to you in the Name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

     How do you feel about being a branch on Christ’s vine? (John 15:5). Do you like it or would you rather be more independent? Would you rather have greater control over your life? Would you like planning your days on your own, picking the projects that interest you most, working where you think you best fit in? Would you also want to be in charge of the overall direction of your life from beginning to end – a role greater by far than being a mere branch on a vine? Most people dream of being free to pursue their own way of life and happiness. But Martin Luther advises against that. He thinks we are too precarious to carry such a heavy load. We are, after all, “a bubble that quickly bursts” (Luther’s Works 16:270). But on lesser matters there’s no problem. Driving your car, tying your shoes, planting tomatoes in the back yard – you can go ahead with any of these. For when God created the world, “He commanded and empowered man to rule physically over beasts, birds, and fish, to maintain home life, to rear children, to cultivate the fields, to rule over lands and people…. It was not necessary for Christ to give instruction about this, for it was implanted in nature and written in their hearts…. [But] Christ is speaking exclusively of His spiritual kingdom and government, in which God Himself dwells, reigns, and works through His Word and Spirit toward a spiritual, eternal life” (LW 24:228). Even though God is more involved in the spiritual kingdom than in our material, mundane lives, he still sustains us so that we can achieve in those material ways. “The spirit of God has made me, and the breath of the Almighty gives me life” (Job 33:4, Psalm 104:29). And so for Luther it was also true that “God determines everything, so that you may learn to be content with what He has offered and will use even that moderately; then your joy will be in the Lord” (LW 15:121).

     But is that enough? Are you satisfied with running much of the mundane and material realm? Or do you also want to set up your spiritual life as well? “More and more Americans… envision themselves as creators of their own… religions, mixing and matching spiritual and aesthetic and experimental and philosophical traditions” (Tara Burton, Strange Rites: New Religions for a Godless World, 2020, p. 10). Is that you? If it is, then God’s word is coming after you to cut you down to size and refashion you into his children (Hebrews 4:12–13, 2 Corinthians 3:18). That’s because in this spiritual kingdom everything’s reversed – “You did not choose me, but I chose you” (John 15:16). He isn’t looking for the cooperative – but for the sick and wayward (Mark 2:17). “I spread out my hands all the day to a rebellious people, who walk in a way that is not good, following their own devices…. Who say, ‘Keep to yourself, do not come near me’” (Isaiah 65:2–5). Then the most alarming thing happens – and the earth quakes (Matthew 27:51). God’s only son, Christ Jesus, is crucified. He’s “the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).

     In his terrible death, Jesus bears the sins of the world and is punished for them (1 Peter 2:24). When we believe in Jesus, his crucifixion saves us from having to be punished for our sins. Finally we are free (Galatians 5:1)! We need this sacrifice (Hebrews 9:26) because “I and the works of all men are too feeble to help me wipe out sin, reconcile God, [and] conquer death” (LW 24:41). We also need it because we are “ashamed of our humanity” for the wrong we have collectively done (Pope Francis, On Fraternity, 2020, §248). Just think of the wild tulip trade in the 1630s based on speculative future markets and short selling, with a product turned into an erotic goddess – “curved as the form of the new Moon, her color is well apportioned, clean, well proportioned; almond in shape” (Mike Dash, Tulipomania, 1999, pp. 116, 203). So when Jesus dies for us it is “surely the greatest love” that can be shown because “He came down from heaven to take your place and willingly shed His blood [when you were] damned and were His enemies” (LW 24:251). So Luther has Jesus say – “If you are sinful in yourselves, you are justified in me; if you feel death in you, you have life in Me; if you have strife in you, you have peace in Me; if you stand condemned on your own account, you are blessed and saved in Me” (LW 24:141). Alleluia! “Faith makes Christ ours, and His love makes us His. He loves, we believe; thus we are united into one cake” (LW 75:217). No longer then does fear of the future plague us, and our lifelong bondage” to the fear of death assail us (Hebrews 4:15). We have been saved from the fires of hell and we are free (Mark 9:48). Let not the devil rob you of this future joy with his malicious words – “O let us shut the future out, lest thought should poison with the shaft of doubt the happy now!” (George Santayana, Lucifer: A Theological Tragedy, 1889, p. 31). And that future joy will also help us weather the trauma of our present life which the devil also tries to cover-up – including that “many more infectious diseases have emerged over the past century than have been eradicated” (Charles Kenny, The Plague Cycle: The Unending War Between Humanity and Infectious Disease, 2021, p. xi).

     So be of good cheer (John 16:33). Through this faith in Christ the Christian “soars outside himself and beyond himself into Christ” (LW 24:143). And that flight also gives us room to love others (John 13:34). Without Christ we are turned in on ourselves (LW 25:313) – incurvatus in se in Luther’s original Latin. No soaring into Christ then. No loving of the neighbor then. For indeed “the source of our holiness” is outside of ourselves (LW 24:172). So with truly thankful hearts, bless the Lord for the flight of the spirit he has bestowed on you – from outside of you. Don’t be “wild branches” (LW 68:118) – relying on yourself and going your own way (Proverbs 3:5). Give thanks for the gift of faith (Ephesians 2:8). Know that “if faith is not present, then all our deeds and life are worth nothing before God, and no truly good works can happen” (LW 77:280). Know that “all our works, even the best, are sinful and damned to hell in the sight of God. God’s Word has already pronounced wrath on man’s own ability, power, and works. Whatever does not abide in this Vine Christ must be condemned and exterminated” (LW 24:219). So take your faith seriously and venture out in love for one another.

     But how shall we do that? “Outdo one another in showing honor,... be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints, practice hospitality. Bless those who persecute you…. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep…. Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; never be conceited. Repay no one evil for evil…. If your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him drink…. Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good” (Romans 12:10–20). And don’t be half-hearted about any of this. “Work heartily, as serving the Lord and not men” (Colossians 3:23). Give it your all. Know how much it matters to God. “Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another” (1 John 4:11). So work heartily – or ex animo operamini as the old Latin Bible puts it. Ex animo operamini. Do this and you will show through your achievements just how consistently and how tenaciously you depend on Christ. Amen.

 

Hymn of the Day: “Amid the World’s Bleak Wilderness” (LBW 378)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd_kLnwX0uU



 



Litany on the

Coronavirus Disease 2020 (COVID-19)

 

 

Let us pray for all those worldwide who have died from COVID-19. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us give thanks for the government agencies and other medical research teams who are diligently working to curb the spread of this virus. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for the many who are sick and suffering from this disease. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

And let us also pray for all those grieving the loss of loved ones who have died from COVID-19. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for the many who are caring for the infected and the sick, that full health and strength and peace may be granted. Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Let us pray for our world where we’re but sojourners (Psalm 119:19; Philippians 3:20), that we may not be punished by disease and pestilence (Ezekiel 14:21, Luke 13:5, John 5:14), and that health and peace may abound for all – for it is Christ who takes upon himself “our infirmities and diseases” (Matthew 8:17). Lord in your mercy,

 

HEAR OUR PRAYER.

 

Finally, in our fear of disease and sickness – may we ever remember God’s power to heal (Jeremiah 17:14, James 5:14), those many kept safe from COVID-19 and other infectious diseases, and our Savior Jesus who, by his mercy and in his time, rekindles our faith by restoring health in this vulnerable and perilous life (2 Kings 5:14, Acts 3:6).

 

GLORY BE TO CHRIST OUR LORD & GREAT HEALER! AMEN.



 



LUTHER on epidemics

 

“Some people are of the firm opinion that one… should not run away from a deadly plague. Rather, since death is God’s punishment, which he sends upon us for our sins, we must submit to God…. I cannot censure [this] excellent decision…. It takes more than a milk faith [1 Corinthians 3:2] to await a death before which most of the saints… are in dread…. [But since] it is generally true of Christians that few are strong and many are weak, one simply cannot place the same burden upon everyone…. Peter could walk upon the water because he was strong in faith. When he began to doubt,… he sank and almost drowned [Matthew 14:30]…. Let him who has a strong faith wait for his death, but he should not condemn those who take flight…. [Even so, know that] all illnesses are punishments from God…. [These punishments] come upon us, not only to chastise us for our sins but also to test our faith and love…. [So] my dear friends,… use medicines… which can help you; fumigate house, yard, and street; shun persons and places wherever your neighbor… has recovered, and act like a man who wants to help put out the burning city. What else is the epidemic but a fire?... You ought to think this way: ‘Very well, by God’s decree the enemy has sent us poison…. Therefore I shall ask God mercifully to protect us. Then I shall… administer medicine and take it. I shall avoid places and persons where my presence is not needed in order not to become contaminated and thus perchance infect and pollute others, and so cause their death as a result of my negligence. If God should wish to take me, he will surely find me and I have done what he has expected of me and so I am not responsible for either my own death or the death of others. If my neighbor needs me, however, I shall not avoid place or person but will go freely…. This is such a God-fearing faith because it is neither brash nor foolhardy and does not tempt God.’”

 

[Martin Luther, Whether One May Flee from a Deadly

Plague (1527), Luther’s Works 43:120, 124, 127, 131–32.]




 


Intercessions:

 

We remember in prayer church members.

Leah &Melissa Baker

Marlis Ormiston

Eileen & Dave Nestoss

Connor Bisticas

Kyra Stromberg

Sam & Nancy Lawson

The Tuomi Family

Holly Petersen

Rollie

 

                                                                       

We also pray for friends of the parish

who stand in need of God’s care.

Karen Granger

Tabitha Anderson

The Rev. Randy Olson

The Rev. Howard Fosser

The Rev. Kari Reiten

The Rev. Alan Gardner

The Rev. Allen Bidne

The Rev. Albin Fogelquist

Kari Meier

Yuriko Nishimura

Leslie Hicks

Eric Baxter

Evelyn, Emily & Gordon Wilhelm

Garrett Metzler

Lesa Christensen

Noel Curtis

Antonio Ortez

Garrison Radcliffe

Richard Patishnock

Jeff Hancock

Holly & Terence Finan

Ty Wick

Lori Aarstad

Anthony Brisbane

Dona Brost  

Susan Curry

Karin Weyer

Robert Shull family

Alan Morgan family

Geri Zerr & Mark

Lucy Shearer

Ramona King

Karen Berg

Donna & Grover Mullen

Patty Johnson

Kurt Weigel

Ethan, Erin and Kevin Vodka

Carol Estes

Paul Jensen

Wendy Pegelow

Tak On Wong & Chee Li Ma

Steve Arkle

Hank Schmitt

Ron Combs

Mary Ford

Andrea and Hayden Cantu

The Pritchard family

Liam Stein

 

Pray for unbelievers, the addicted, the sexually abused and harassed, the homeless, the hungry and the unemployed. Pray for the many dying from COVID-19in India. Pray for the many who died in the accident in Israel. Pray for those killed by police this past week in California, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and Texas. Pray also for refugees throughout the world; and for the care and keeping of our planet.

 

 

                                                                       

 

Professional Health Care Providers

Gina Allen

Janine Douglass

David Juhl

Dana Kahn

Dean Riskedahl



 



Holy Communion in Spirit and Truth

Without the Consecrated Bread and Wine

 

[The ancient church doctrine of concomitantia teaches that the faithful can receive Christ’s Presence in Holy Communion by drinking the wine without eating any bread, or by eating the bread without drinking any wine (The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, ed. F. L. Cross, 1958, 1966, pp. 320–21). By extension, in extreme cases, the faithful can also, then, receive Christ’s Presence without eating the bread or drinking the wine. Those would be cases of illness when nothing can be ingested through the mouth, or when lost in the wilderness – living off nothing but wild animals and berries. In those cases we keep the memory of Jesus in the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 11:24) – honoring our Savior “in spirit and truth” (John 4:23). So pray the words below, all you baptized, who love the Lord Jesus, and “hunger and thirst for righteous,” that you may be satisfied (Matthew 5:6). This is not a substitute for Holy Communion, but rather a devout practice when receiving Holy Communion in times of pestilence and plague would recklessly endanger the church (Luther’s Works 43:132–33).]

 

Let us pray: O Lord, our God, we remember this day our savior Jesus, who “was put to death for our trespasses and raised for our justification” (Romans 4:24). May his Spirit “bring to remembrance” all that he did for us, and continues to do, to bless us (John 14:26). Fill us with the assurance that our sins are truly forgiven for his sake, and that the promise of eternal life will not be taken away. Amen.

 

Let us pray: On this day, heavenly Father, we also pray in the name of Jesus, that one day soon we will be able to gather together at the Altar of our church, and so eat of the flesh of our Lord and drink of his blood, that his very life may well up in us so that we may abide in him forever (John 6:53–56). Amen.



 



 

The Lord’s Prayer

 

Benediction: The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you; the Lord look upon you with favor and give you peace. In the name of God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.  


Closing Hymn: “At the Lamb’s High Feast We Sing” (LBW 210)



 



 

It is the Holy Spirit who gives you Christ and His holiness and who works faith in you. To be sure, the Holy Spirit sometimes lets His Christians fall, err, stumble, and sin. This is to forestall any complacency, as though we were holy of ourselves, and to teach us to know ourselves and the source of our holiness. Otherwise we would become arrogant and overweening.

 

Martin Luther, Sermons on John 14 (1537)

Luther’s Works 24:172